Programmes

Our Core Programmes

The TMZ Foundation concentrates on supporting four pioneering programmes: breast cancer; cervical cancer; HIV/AIDS; and Tuberculosis.

We implement preventative health education programmes for under-served communities, and also contribute to the training and development of community healthcare workers, community healthcare worker coordinators and NGOs working on these health challenges.  We are deeply committed and invested in supporting the health and development of vulnerable groups, especially women, children and those in the rural communities.

HIV/AIDS

AIDS / HIV

Our Patron’s role as UNAIDS Special Advocate for the Health of Women, Children and Youth, and as a member of the Organisation of African First Ladies against HIV/AIDS (OAFLA) means that the Foundation’s HIV and AIDS programs are focused on achieving Sustainable Development Goals to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030.

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Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis

Among HIV-infected children, tuberculosis accounts for up to one in five deaths. Insufficient integration of TB care into HIV programmes has weakened the national response to this disease. The Foundation will thus focus on integrating TB and HIV in order to address the inter-relationship that drives both diseases.

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Cervical
Cancer

Cervical Cancer

With HIV becoming a chronic disease, rural communities are now experiencing a marked increase in associated cancer cases. In rural areas where HIV education is low, the added pressure of cancer requires collaboration and linking of these diseases through education.

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Breast
Cancer

Breast Cancer

Breast cancer represents 32% of all female cancers. It is the most common female cancer worldwide with a lifetime incidence risk of 1:8 and a 1:28 lifetime risk of death. It is the commonest cause of cancer death in women aged 35-55 years. South African epidemiological data are incomplete but appear to emulate international figures, with breast cancer overtaking cervical cancer as the most common female malignancy.

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